Cat Vaccines

Cat vaccines are a very important part of your cat’s healthcare plan. Vaccines will prevent many illnesses that your cat is susceptible to. Your vet will be able to tell you which vaccines your cat needs, and the schedule at which the cat should receive these vaccines.



The cat vaccines available today can enhance your pet’s health level, making them even healthier and allowing them to live longer lives. There are vaccines available that will prevent feline leukemia, prevention of respiratory diseases and other problems common to your cat.

Care should be taken to note that vaccines are not entirely problem free. They are however, the reason that your cat can live a longer and healthier life.

Common vaccines that are a necessity will include:

  • Feline Panleukopenia (feline distemper) – The vaccine should be given at the initial visit and then every 3-4 weeks after until the cat is 12 weeks old. It should then be administered again after 1 year and then after that the cat should have a booster every 3 years.
  • Feline Viral rhinotracheitis and Feline calicivirus (FHV/FCV) – This vaccine should be given much like the feline distemper vaccine. The initial dose at the first visit, and then every 3-4 weeks until the cat reaches 12 weeks old. After that, a booster should be given after one year, and then follow-ups every 3 years.
  • Rabies – There are a couple of different kinds of rabies vaccines, and this vaccine is required by law in all states. The first is the rabies vaccine as we all know it. It is given each year, and a tag is required to be issued showing that the vaccine was given. The tag is numbered, and the authorities can call and get verification that the vaccine has actually been administered. The other type is good for 3 years.
  • Feline Leukemia – Feline leukemia vaccine should be given at around 8 weeks and then a second dose at 12 weeks. After that a booster should be given once every year.

As you might notice from the schedule shown above, the annual checkup is more important than ever to keep your cat up to date with all of its boosters. This is especially so with the rabies vaccine, but the vet will also need to keep a check on your cat to make sure things are going well. Any questions should of course be directed directly to your vet, who will have a better idea about the health of your pet.
The key to every aspect of your cat’s healthcare is education. Vaccinations are no exception. These vaccinations have moved from being a one size fits all type of approach to a more individualized stand point, with the vaccination needs being catered more to an individual cat and its overall health at the time of the vet visit. Again, anytime you have any question whatsoever about the cat vaccines and any risk that may be associated with them.


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